Saturday, June 11, 2011

The Dresden Bank

A bank note from The Dresden Bank, Dresden TN.  John Williamson Moran and James Henderson Moran III were the first and second presidents of the bank.

From the Dresden Enterprise February 28, 1890:

Advertisement for The Dresden Bank  Capital
        $100,000  Now ready for Business
 J.W. MORAN, President 
 J.W. JETER, Vice President
 George BOYD, Cashier
 Directors In addition to the above
 J. E. DUNLAP, R. W. MOSS, Polk ALEXANDER, H. H. BARR,
 E. H. AYERS, R. H. BEARD, S. P. SCOTT, T. H. SWAIM,
 T. H. FARMER, T. A. McELWRATH, W.D. JANES 
 Stockholder Names Listed In addition to above
 G. M. BRASFIELD, W. Y. BRUMMITT, I.L.BRIENDINE,
 W. R. BOBBOTT, G. I. BAXTER, E. E. BELL, Mrs. E. R. BRASFIELD,
 W. S. CARNEY, G. S. BOYD, Miss Mary DREWRY, L. B. EDWARDS,
 G. W. EDMONSTON, J. B. EZELL, J. W. ETHERIDGE,
 Mrs. D. A. FRAZIER, W. W. FULLER, Thomas FOSTER,
 F. P. FONVILLE, B.L. FINCH, R. G. FONVILLE, C. S. FOWLER,
 W. K. GIBBS, J.M. GLASS, W. R. GLASS, Nannie T. GLASS,
 HART and BRIGG, W. L. HAMILTON, Mrs. L.HAMILTON, 
 J. S. HORNSBY, Lea HARRIS, B. D. IRVINE, H. HEATH,
 IRVINE and SCOTT, Jno. W. JETER, T. A. JONES, G. W. JETER,
 H. H. LOVELACE, J.P. LYNN, Ed LYON, T. E. LOYD,
 Mrs Addie LEWIS, MoOORE & Co, Geo.W. MARTIN,
 T. J. MICHELL, J. H. McCLAIN, Miss M. F. McCLAIN,
 McELWRATH and BONDURANT, C. P. MEADOWS, J. A. MYRICK,
 R. A. McCLAIN, I. F. McCLAIN, F. PARKS, C. J. PAGE,
 Mrs. L. F. PEERY, W. C. ROSS, M. V. ROBERTS,
 Mrs M. A. ROGERS, J. B. STAFFORD, C. A. SWAIM,
 A. M. SMYTH, John L. SMITH, G. W. SIMMONS,
 H. K. STEPHENSON, Mrs. M. J. TRAVIS, Mrs.E. C. TRAVIS,
 J. C. TURBEVILLE, W. N. THOMPSON, W. J. VOWELL, D. T. WINSTON,
 J. W. WESCOAT, T. L. WOODS. 

United Confederate Veterans June 22-24, 1897

This is the insert from the Confederate Veteran, July 1897, announcing the Seventh Annual Reunion of the United Confederate Veterans in Nashville, Tennessee, June 22-24, 1897.  Being a veteran of the Civil War, John Williamson Moran would've naturally attended the event.



Friday, June 10, 2011

Marion Agnes Moran and Charles Henry Cobb Wedding Invitation 1905


This is the wedding invitation announcing the marriage of Marion Agnes Moran to Charles Henry Cobb, October 3 1905.   She and Cobb had one daughter, Carolyn Elizabeth Cobb.  Marion committed suicide October 1, 1934 and is
buried in East View Cemetery, Union City TN.

Thursday, June 9, 2011

Morans and Baums

right to left: Harry L. Baum Jr, Virginia Shumate Moran, James Henderson Moran IV, Martha Belle Shumate Baum, and Nathan Harrell Moran.  Harry and Nathan were both born in 1918 so this picture is from 1918-1919.  Martha Belle Shumate was Dr. Harry L. Baum's first wife.  He later married Ellen Norine Schryver and they had a son, William S. Baum born in 1939.

Nathan Harrell Moran lowriding in 1918

This is a very young Nathan (Bub) Harrell Moran in his perambulator on a fine summer day in front of the Moran home.

At home in Dresden, 1918

This is Virginia Shumate Moran holding her second born, Nathan Harrell Moran (b April 1918).  The fellow in the sailor suit is his  older brother James Henderson Moran IV.  This picture is from a scanned negative that was taken in 1918.

John Williamson Moran and family

Left to right: Ida Moran, Sophia Riley Gunn Moran (seated), Charles Harrell Moran, Marion Moran, Fannie L. Moran, John Williamson Moran, James Henderson Moran.  This picture was taken abt 1890-1893 because Sophia Moran died in 1895 in the yellow fever epidemic.

Wednesday, June 8, 2011

Fannie L. Moran, Marion Moran and Ida Moran

Fannie L. Moran, Marion Moran and Ida Moran.  left to right.

The Children of John Williamson Moran and Sophia Riley Gunn

From left to right: Fannie L. Moran, Charles Harrell Moran, Marion A. Moran, James H. Moran III, Ida M. Moran

Moran Home, Interior Picture. First Floor

This sitting area is on the first floor near the front door.  The architectural features remain the same to this day.  At some point the wall-to-wall carpet was taken up and and it's now hardwood floors with area rugs.


This looks like an urn atop the railing of the stairs but it is wood and part of the ornate staircase.  You can see another  one on the next landing in the above picture.  The "urn" feature could come be removed and the Moran children would use it as a hiding  place for their letters to Santa Clause.

Orlean Scott - 6 yrs old

Orlean Scott, age 6.  Taken in Gainesville, TX.  She is part of the Scott branch of the Moran family tree.

Transcribed back side: With Love From Orlean Scott.  Age 6 years.  June 24, 1900.

Tuesday, June 7, 2011

Birth Announcements

 Even well-to-do babies had calling cards!  Used in place of a birth announcement, a smaller card was attached with a ribbon to the calling card of the parents. The only information included was the date.  No reference to such things as height, weight or time were deemed necessary.
This is the card announcing the birth of Marion Louise Moran, September 24, 1923 to Mr. and Mrs. James Henderson Moran.


James Henderson Moran III and Charles Harrell Moran


James (Jimmie) Henderson Moran III (shown on the left) and Charles (Brud) Harrell Moran (shown on the right).  This picture was taken on the front porch of the Moran home in front of the double doors.  This was probably taken in the early 1900's as we think Jim and Harrell are in their early twenties.
The picture was found among paperwork belonging to the W.G. Timberlake family and on the back is written: For Mrs. W. G. Timberlake who was also Ida Moran.  The sister of the two jaunty fellows in the picture.

Possibly a Timberlake Home, Madison County TN

Ida Moran and William G. Timberlake were married in 1902.

And what's really nifty is finding surprises like this.  I zoomed in on the scanned image and found a woman standing on the porch.  



Monday, June 6, 2011

Mary A. Reavis Holt - Moran Family Friend



Mary A Reavis was the third wife of  Capt. William Carroll Holt.  The couple married in Dresden Tennessee on Oct  17 1887.  The Holt's were childless.  Capt Holt died Jan 23 1901 and Mary Reavis Holt died April 20 1924 in Dresden.  The Reavis family still has descendants in Dresden TN.  This photo was in one of the Moran photo albums.

Mary's father was Isaac Calvin Reavis and her mother was Mary Ann Travillian.   William Holt's parents were Michael Holt and Hannah Martin.

Moran Home, Interior Picture



This picture was taken between 1895-1920 and is the upstairs bedroom that faces the street.  We know it was taken pre-1920 because there is no light switch on the wall by the door.  Electricity wasn't installed till after 1920.  We don't know who the woman is.  Some of the pieces of furniture in this picture are still in the house today.  

Fannie Lemira Moran





Fannie Lemira Moran, b Oct 23 1872 d. May 3 1955, was the eldest daughter of John Williamson Moran and Sophia Riley Gunn Moran.  She married James B. Ezzell abt 1898.

Unknown girl tintype

One of several tintypes found in a Moran family photo album.  Friend or family member?

The Dresden Bank's New President

Clipping from the Dresden Enterprise found among the papers of Virginia Shumate Moran.

James H. Moran became the youngest bank president in the state of Tennessee when he was elected to the position after the death of his father, John Williamson Moran.

The Dresden Bank's New President.
Dresden enjoys a rare distinction, in that one of her citizens is the youngest bank president in the state, perhaps in the South.

A called meeting of the board of directors of the Dresden Bank was held at the offices of the bank on Monday afternoon for the election of a successor to Mr. J.W. Moran, deceased, when Mr. James H. Moran, youngest son of the late president of the bank, was unanimously chosen to head this well-known and popular financial institution.  His election to this exalted and responsible position is a recognition on the part of the board of directors of the sterling qualities and characteristics of James Moran possessed by his illustrated father, and the friends of the bank may be assured of that cordiality, that glad-hand from the new president that they received from the old.
While this is indeed a splendid compliment, it is not an undeserved one, for Jim Moran possesses the ability and is in every way capable of shouldering the grave responsibilities placed upon his shoulders.  The Enterprise extends congratulations.
Mr. Harrell Moran was elected a member of the board of directors to succeed his father in that capacity.  He has been the assistant cashier for a number of years.

Sunday, June 5, 2011

The Death of B.D. Irvine, Prominent Dresden Citizen 1916

Funeral notice of 
Benjamin D. Irvine, 
husband of Agnes Moran.  



Dresden Enterprise February 1916
Honored Citizen Passed Away
Death of B.D. Irvine Removes One of the County's Best Known Men

In the death of Benjamin D. Irvine, Dresden and Weakley county loses one of the oldest and best known men.  Mr. Irvine died Sunday afternoon at 1 o'clock at his home in Dresden following a brief illness. On Monday of last week Mr. Irvine was down town, but quite feeble, as he had been most of the winter.  Going home, he took his bed, but his condition did not become critical until Saturday, and many of his friends in town did not even know of his illness.  He sank rapidly.

Mr. Irvine was the son of Sam Irvine, for many years circuit court clerk of this county.  His mother was a Miss Jones, his parents coming here from Virginia and settling on Thompson Creek, nine miles east of Dresden, where the deceased was born and reared.  And where he received education in the common schools of the community.

When about twenty years of age, Mr. Irvine came to Dresden to reside, being deputy to his father, and it was evidently in this station that he learned the methods of careful business transactions that afterwards characterized his life, he being considered one of the best business men of the country.  In early life he was united in marriage to Miss Agnes Moran, sister of the late John W. Moran.  To this union thirteen children were born, eight, with their sainted mother, surviving him, as follows:  Thomas E. Irvine, California; Sidney Irvine, Bowie, Texas; Robert Lee Irvine and James A. A Irvine and Moran Irvine and Mrs. Sophia Irvine Ferguson, Dresden: Forrest Dabney Irvine, Ft. Worth, Texas; and William Preston Irvine, Georgia.

In early life Mr. Irvine engaged in the mercantile business in Dresden, remaining in public life until the early '90's when he retired.  During his long and successful business career he was associated with such well-known men as Tom Baker, now cashier of a leading bank at Paducah; John R. Moore, John W. Moran, C.W. Cottrell and others of equal prominence.  All these relations terminated most pleasantly most agreeably, there being no word of criticism, no spark of ill feeling, nothing but the most cordial, friendly relations between himself and his business partners.  The reason of this was his fair, honorable, open methods, his fairness toward his associates and his generous disposition.  There was nothing little about the man.  He was broad and liberal in all matters.  While in those days he was making money, paying not as much attention to the future welfare of his soul as in his latter days, yet he was a liberal contributor to religious matters, evidenced by his generous donation when the present Methodist Church was erected, and his donation of both the lots on which stand the Presbyterian and Baptist churches here.

All his characteristics were positive none, negative.  The ties of friendship were enduring and strong with him.  Possessing a high sense of honor, his word was his bond; and it has been said of him by one who is in a position to know, that he never knew Mr. Irvine, in all the latter's various and many business transactions to take an undue advantage in a business deal. He was absolutely without guile.  He was an unassuming man.  Perhaps his strongest characteristic was his generosity and indulgence toward his family.  He possessed and analytic mind, weighing carefully and and all matters he had in hand.

At the very bottom, in faint lettering:
Christ is my hope
During the latter years of his life a great change had come over him spiritually.  He spent many long hours searching the scriptures, which, as was said at his funeral, resulted in his conversion and recognition of "Christ as his hope."  This inscription "Christ is my Hope" was engraved upon his tomb at his direction before his demise, and he left every assurance that he fully believed in and trusted in the saving grace of his Master.

Nor more gentlemanly, affectionate, modest man ever lived in Dresden than Uncle Ben Irvine, who is now gone to his final home.  Peace to his ashes.  Funeral services were conducted at his late home Monday afternoon by Rev. G.T. Mayo, A.E. Scott and D.C. Johnson, and a worthy tribute paid him by his life long friend, Mr. Geo. S. Boyd.  The remains were held over to Tuesday morning, pending arrival of two sons from Texas, and laid to rest at 10 o'clock Tuesday at the Dresden Cemetery.

The following is from  Goodspeed's History of Tennessee:

B. D. IRVINE, farmer and miller of Dresden, Tenn., is a native of Weakley County, Tenn., born October 31, 1832, son of Samuel and Catherine (Jones) Irvine.  He was educated in the neighboring schools and in Dresden, and made his home with his parents until he was fourteen years of age.  e served four years as his father's deputy.  In 1855 he and his brother R. N. and J. E. Freeman engaged in merchandising, and November 5, 1856, he married Agnes Moran, daughter of James H. and Harriet Moran.  Mrs. Irvine was born October 7, 1838, in Dresden, and became the mother of twelve children, ten of whom are living: Harry C., who is in Texas; Thomas B., who is in South America; John B., James A., Florence, Robert L., Moran, Sophia A., Forest D. and William P.   In 1857 Mr. Irvine sold his interest in the mercantile establishment to his brother and Mr. Freeman, and with T. A. Baker established a now firm, continuing two years.  He owns 450 acres of fine land, and a handsome residence in the suburbs of Dresden.   In 1880 he, C. W. Cottrell, G. S. Boyd and S. P. Scott engaged in merchandising and milling, the dry goods firm being known as Cottrell, Irvine & Co., and the milling firm as Scott, Boyd & Co.   In 1883 Mr. Cottrell bought the store, and Mr. Irvine and Mr. Scott bought Mr. Boyd's and Mr. Cottrell's interest in the mill, and from that time until the present the firm has been known as Irvine & Scott.   For the past thirty years Mr. Irvine has been one of Weakley County's enterprising business men.   He is a Democrat, and his first presidential vote was cast for James Buchanan.  In 1876 he was elected trustee of Weakley County, and served in that capacity two years.   He is a member of the Masonic, I.O.O.F., K. of H. and A.0.U.W. fraternities, and his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.





John Williamson Moran

b. March 26, 1840  d. April 12, 1912
John W. Moran enlisted in the Confederate Army in 1861 as part of Company I 31st Tennessee Regiment. He started as a Private then was Regimental 1st Sergeant. He then became 1st Lieutenant. He surrendered in North Carolina with the Army of Tennessee at the end of the war in May 1865.
He married Sophia Riley Gunn and he commissioned the building of a large, Victorian house in the late 1890's which would become known as Moran Place.  His descendants still own the home.

Gertrude Hays - Jackson TN




This is probably Ida Gertrude Hays who was born  in April 1889, Jackson TN.   She grew up to marry Reuben H. Scott in 1911. The Scotts are relatives of the Morans.



In pencil on the backside is written : For Miss Fannie From Little Gertrude.  Someone else wrote in ink Gertrude Hays.  The Fannie that is mentioned is Fannie Lemira Moran (b. abt 1873) of Dresden, TN and she married James B. Ezzell.  Their daughter was Sophia E. Ezzell.

Mrs. Charles H. Cobb (Marion Moran) Union City TN

These newspaper clippings and appreciation card were found among the papers of Virginia Shumate Moran.

 The first Mrs. Charles H. Cobb was born Marion Moran abt 1884 which places her death in 1934 since the article states she was about 50 when she died.  She was one of the daughters of John Williamson Moran and Sophia Riley Gunn Moran of Dresden TN.  She was married to Charles Henry Cobb of Union City TN and was the mother of Carolyn Elizabeth Cobb Godown, the second wife of Joseph Linton Godown. (link to wedding invitation).

Body of Woman Found in River
Camden, Tenn -(SPL)--The body of Mrs. C.H. Cobb, about 50, wife of the clerk and master of Union City, was found floating on the surface of the Tennessee River here this morning near a bridge from which officers believe she jumped late yesterday. The body was ordered removed to Union City immediately.  Funeral arrangements were to be announced this afternoon.  Mrs. Cobb's automobile was found parked on the bridge about 5:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon.  A purse in the auto contained identification cards and personal effects of Mrs. Cobb. Searching parties dragged the river near the bridge throughout the night.  The body was found by John Divinity, apparently immediately after it rose to the surface.No motive for suicide by the woman was established. 


Tennessee River Dragged for Body of Missing Woman
Mrs. C.H. Cobb's Auto Is Found Parked on Span Near Camden.
Camden, Tenn, Oct 1-(SPL)

A searching party tonight was dragging the Tennessee river near here for the body of Mrs. Charles Henry Cobb, about 50, wife of the clerk and master of Union City, Tenn., whose automobile was found parked on the toll bridge over the river late today.  The search was started after Mrs. Cobb's husband, her daughter, Miss Caroline Cobb, and her two brothers, Jim and Hal Moran, arrived here tonight.  The husband had been notified soon after the parked automobile was discovered by Trabue Lewis state highway patrolman.  Patrolman Lewis said the missing driver of the automobile was identified by a visiting card found in a purse she had left in the machine.  The automobile was parked at a point on the bridge about midway over the river.  Upon his arrival here from Union City, Mr. Cobb expressed fear that his wife had plunged into the stream but said he could not account for such action.  He said she left home about noon today with a bundle of clothes she said she was going to take to a Union City laundry.  The automobile was noticed on the side of the bridge this afternoon between 5:30 and 6 o'clock, Patrolman Lewis declared.  The officer immediately got in touch with Mr Cobb after he had searched the car and found the card in a purse that contained about $2 in change.  Partolman Lewis said between 15 and 20 mussel diggers had joined a searching party led by John Wiley Lashlee of Camden, representative in the state Legislature farmer and ferry owner, and they planned to drag the river in an all night search for the body.  Assisting in the search also were Sheriff Jim Westbrook and Deputy Sheriff Dorsey McCann of Humphreys county.